blogging, books, reading

The Unpopular Opinions Post

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Warning: Some of these thoughts may not be popular. But there is this unfortunate thing going around, of people feeling that it’s not all right to be different from the mainstream. So, I am here to proclaim, without shame, that I do not agree with some of the most agreed-on views in the book blogging world.

There are several books on the bestsellers list that “everyone” loves, and I simply did not like. There’s also nothing wrong with this. It’s just a matter of opinion, and we’re all allowed to determine what our criteria is for a “good book.” And we shouldn’t feel embarrassed — or even worse, be taunted online — if our ideas don’t line up with someone else’s.

I can skip tags, challenges, and memes, and still have a successful blog. This really goes hand in hand with the fact I needed time to blog without blogging taking up so much time. For anyone who’s ever attempted any of the above, you know that it’s time consuming. When you have a family, and there are other things than the next post demanding your attention, we really need to start feeling less that we “have to” complete one of the above, or “nobody” will read our content. That’s just not true.

So I’m not reviewing that new YA release that 90% of the community is — big deal. Since you’ve all read about the latest in that series/genre/fandom already, won’t you be happy to read something different on my site?

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I may decide not to do ARCs, after all. ARCs can equal stress. The more I look into it, the more I think it’s not for me. Again, there’s the significant and very real time issue. Also, there’s the quite true concern that I read for enjoyment, and to learn, and have the feels I want to. What if I can’t finish ARCs because they just aren’t turning out how I’d hoped, but I need to write the review, and I don’t want the author/publisher to hate me, and… This could very well lead to head explosion. Nah, no thanks.

Some social media sites are not for me. I tried being on Pinterest, and just didn’t care, or didn’t get it, or something. There are people on Instagram I’d like to follow, because their photos are lovely amazingness, but the site informs me I have not done this or that to complete setting up my account. I’ve tried to correct this about a dozen times. Still the same error message pops up. Huh?? Whatever, then. I’m going to stop sweating it.

Subscription boxes might be nice, but I just can’t afford them. So, as much as I’d like to have at least one, I think I’ll be giving up my plan to subscribe to a selected service this year. Also, storage space is at a distinct premium in my house, and there simply isn’t the room for anything new that we won’t be immediately using.

It’s okay to get rid of books. If you didn’t like it, or you just can’t see yourself reading it again, trust me, it’s really all right. Those secondhand sales at the public library or charity shops always welcome boxes of books that are guaranteed sellers. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, remember. And just because you didn’t like it doesn’t mean someone else won’t love the mangoes out of it, and then you have successfully made someone’s day by donating your unwanteds. Think of it like that.

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13 thoughts on “The Unpopular Opinions Post”

  1. Awesome, AWESOME post!
    1. I just read and reviewed a book that most people seem to like, but I didn’t.
    2. I don’t do awards, challenges, or tags either, although I always feel guilty when another blogger has passed one on.
    3. I love it when a blogger reviews something different that I haven’t heard of.
    4. I have a love/hate relationship with ARCS. I’m a NetGalley addict, and while I love reading eARCS, there is a lot of pressure I’ve put on myself unnecessarily. Right now for instance, I’m reading 4books so I can have my reviews up before their release dates.
    5. The only social media site I’m on is WordPress. Although I’m on disability and don’t have to work, nor do I have kids (except for my husband), because of my health issues, my blog is really all I can handle right now.
    6. I’d love to try one of those subscription boxes! They look like such fun, but alas, like you, I just don’t have the budget.
    7. Speaking as a former children’s librarian, I can state unequivocally that libraries definitely love donations as long as they’re in decent condition. I have no problem donating books that I know I won’t read again, to my library. I think of it as sharing the book love!😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post!

    I’m so with you on all of these points. I am about to post a review of a book that everyone but me loves. I would like to do awards and stuff, but I just don’t have the time. (Plus everyone seems to do the same ones, which can make for boring reading.)

    I really appreciate it when people review stuff that no one else is. I do love ARCs though. Netgalley does state that you’re not obliged to provide a review, though obviously if that becomes a habit your access will suffer. I don’t put any pressure on myself to review a book by a particular date. I figure that even if my review is after the release date, it will still serve it’s purpose to remind people that it’s there. I also don’t review books that I rate any less than 3 out of 5. I’d rather focus on the positive.

    I have limit space so we do a book cull every 12 months. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I agree with so many of these!! Except for the last one because I just caaaaan’t get rid of books.😂 I should! I’m hopeless!! But I just keep them and they’re slowly taking over my room. *coughs nervously* But omg ARCs are really stressful and I’ve been backing off a LOT on how many I read. And I also often skip reviewing the majorly famous books on my blog. Like I review everything on Goodreads because I love to review, but when everyone’s saying the same things about a book…it gets boring right?! Yay for bloggers who aren’t afraid to just do what they want!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A few months ago, I decided I was going to strive only to review books that were almost unheard of in the blogisphere. Exposure for titles other than the top sellers is important, too!

      Years ago, I never dreamed of getting rid of books, even ones I didn’t like and knew I wouldn’t read again. Now I have no such qualms about it!

      And the more I look into ARCs, the more I’m glad I keep getting denied for them! It may be more trouble than it’s worth!

      Like

  4. I’ve been thinking about these very things for a couple of days now! And here you are posting about them.

    I often feel like I’m the only one who read the book before reviewing. I cringe when I look at a blog and 7/8 posts in the last month were memes/tags/awards. And I’m a sucker for older books. The latest YA book is probably the same as 90% of the others, so you aren’t missing much. Plus it’s good to see what else is around. To ARC or not to ARC, it doesn’t really matter. I’m fine with the having to read it quick, but I the few I’ve tried have been very poor quality. And with social media, the platforms are fine……it’s being social on them I’m no good at. Why does EVERYONE have to be an every platform? Ugh.

    Getting rid of books?! Heresy!!…..Ok, not really. Keep the books that make you happy and ditch the ones that don’t. That’s the way it should be with everything in life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know some people can’t bear the thought of ever getting rid of a book, and there were a few I gave to the library sale that I wished I hadn’t – but it was because the oldest was done with them before we ever knew the youngest was going to be born, and interested in the same things. 😉

      I was a big holdout on social media. And indeed, rather than jumping onto every single site, I picked the ones that were most important to me in terms of who I knew that was already on it, and whether it would help my blogging/communication goals.

      ARCs are beginning to concern me. When I thought about the very idea of sending unproofed copies to my own ARC readers, that made me squirm like a baby octopus. Nope, I want these gracious volunteers to see my best foot forward. They’ll get the same printing everybody who buys it will – just ahead of everyone else.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. In my head I divide ARCs into Galleys and true ARCs. Galleys only have the most superficial copy/editing while a true ARC is all but complete. They’re supposed to be the same but I much prefer this distinction.

        Like

      2. I think the distinction is important for readers. Especially since the readers volunteer for this, and they aren’t being paid. Let’s give them the best experience we can (speaking as an indie author to publishers/other authors).

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Such a great post!! I have decided when I started not do ARCs- and it’s working out for me right now- maybe it’s something I’ll change in the future, but right now I’m happy with that decision. And yes I get what you mean about some social media sites- I’m the exact same. Yeah, I get serious envy about the subscription box thing, but I can’t afford it and I don’t have the space :/ ah well c’est la vie! And yes I agree with you about donating old books- it’s great to think even if I didn’t like a book I might have made someone else’s day by donating it (at least I like to think so) Plus as aforementioned, I need more space

    Like

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